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Homeless in Canada? 1 in 3 Canadians Say You Should Be Allowed Assisted Suicide - Answers in Genesis


Abigail Nobel
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Canada is a lot closer to Michigan than most US states. Wonder how differently the poll would run here?

AIG News video with more discussion at the link.

https://answersingenesis.org/sanctity-of-life/euthanasia/canadians-say-you-should-be-allowed-assisted-suicide/

by Ken Ham on May 30, 2023

If you’re a Canadian who is experiencing poverty or homelessness, don’t worry, your fellow Canadians have your back—nearly 1 in 3 of them are here to help by hoping the government will . . . allow you to end your own life with the assistance of a doctor. Wait—what?

Yes, a recent poll on Canadians’ attitudes towards MAID (medical assistance in dying, Canada’s government-paid euthanasia program) found that:

  • 27% of Canadians are fine with those whose “only affliction was ‘poverty’” qualifying for MAID.
  • 28% gave the thumbs-up for those experiencing homelessness to qualify for MAID.
  • 51% believe an “inability to receive medical treatment” should qualify as a reason for MAID.
  • 20%—that’s 1 in 5—“were fine with MAID being handed out to anybody for any reason.”

A large percentage of Canadians believe poverty, homelessness, lack of medical care, or any other reason should qualify someone to be allowed to kill themselves with the help of a doctor or nurse practitioner for any reason.

Let those numbers sink in for a momentA large percentage of Canadians believe poverty, homelessness, lack of medical care, or any other reason should qualify someone to be allowed to kill themselves with the help of a doctor or nurse practitioner for any reasonWhat a calloused view of human lifeSadly, such responses are consistent with a culture devoid of the fear of God.

But such apathy towards the impoverished, homeless, and sick (and we could add imprisoned too—apparently, “MAID is routinely practiced within the Canadian prison system”) shouldn’t be surprising in our culture of death. After all, we’ve taught generations that they’re just animals, that this life is all there is, that the meaning of life is to be happy, “fulfilled,” and well-traveled, that there is no absolute right or wrong, and that personal and bodily autonomy (“consent”) is the highest moral ethic. So it’s no wonder so many Canadians believe anyone should be allowed to do whatever they want when it comes to death (and if you aren’t happy, well, life is meaningless, so go ahead and ask for MAID). It’s the natural consequence of a secular worldview.

We’ve said before that worldviews have consequences—and bad worldviews have bad consequences. And in this case, deadly consequences:

“While only 2,838 Canadians opted for assisted suicide in the first full year of legalized MAID [2016] . . . as of last count in 2021 that had risen to 10,064 — an increase of 32.4 per cent over just the year before.”

Canada isn’t just sliding down a slippery slope toward becoming a country that “euthanizes its poor”—it’s calmly and purposefully driving right off the cliff with no desire to hit the brakes or steer away.

As Canadian staff member Avery Foley shared with me, what Canadians want for the impoverished and ill among them is a far cry from the words of the Psalm for which Canada was named (many people don’t know the formal title for Canada is the Dominion of Canada, borrowed from Psalm 72:8. The name originally reflected the desire that the ultimate King would have dominion from “sea to sea”):

Give the king your justice, O God,
    and your righteousness to the royal son!
May he judge your people with righteousness,
    and your poor with justice!
Let the mountains bear prosperity for the people,
    and the hills, in righteousness!
May he defend the cause of the poor of the people,
    give deliverance to the children of the needy,
    and crush the oppressor!

May they fear you while the sun endures,
    and as long as the moon, throughout all generations!
May he be like rain that falls on the mown grass,
    like showers that water the earth!
In his days may the righteous flourish,
    and peace abound, till the moon be no more!

May he have dominion from sea to sea,
    and from the River to the ends of the earth!
May desert tribes bow down before him,
    and his enemies lick the dust!
May the kings of Tarshish and of the coastlands
    render him tribute;
may the kings of Sheba and Seba
    bring gifts!
May all kings fall down before him,
    all nations serve him!

For he delivers the needy when he calls,
    the poor and him who has no helper.
He has pity on the weak and the needy,
    and saves the lives of the needy.
From oppression and violence he redeems their life,
    and precious is their blood in his sight.

Long may he live;
    may gold of Sheba be given to him!
May prayer be made for him continually,
    and blessings invoked for him all the day!
May there be abundance of grain in the land;
    on the tops of the mountains may it wave;
    may its fruit be like Lebanon;
and may people blossom in the cities
    like the grass of the field!
May his name endure forever,
    his fame continue as long as the sun!
May people be blessed in him,
    all nations call him blessed!

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel,
    who alone does wondrous things.
Blessed be his glorious name forever;
    may the whole earth be filled with his glory!
Amen and Amen!

The prayers of David, the son of Jesse, are ended. (Psalm 72:1–20, emphasis added)

It’s only the gospel that changes hearts and minds, helping us love the neediest among us, seeing their inherent value as an image bearer of God (Genesis 1:27) and their ultimate need for the Savior.

If only our northern neighbors (and here in America!) had leaders who would pray that Psalm over their term in office and seek to live it outInstead, many leaders are bent on wickedness, shaking their fists at God and ensuring that the poor receive death instead of justice and aidMay this be a reminder to (1) pray for our leadership and (2) share the gospel—it’s only the gospel that changes hearts and minds, helping us love the neediest among us, seeing their inherent value as an image bearer of God (Genesis 1:27) and their ultimate need for the Savior.

Get More Answers on Answers News

This item was discussed today on Answers News with cohosts Tim Chaffey, Patricia Engler, and Roger Patterson. Answers News is our weekly news program filmed live before a studio audience here at the Creation Museum and broadcast on our Answers in Genesis YouTube channel and posted to Answers TV.

Ken Ham is the founder and CEO of Answers in Genesis and its two popular attractions: the acclaimed Creation Museum and the internationally known Ark Encounter, which features a life-size 510-foot-long Noah’s Ark—sometimes described as the “8th Wonder of the Modern World.” Each year, the two attractions host over 1.5 million guests.

A much-in-demand Christian speaker and interview guest, Ham became well known throughout America for his 2014 evolution/creation debate with Bill Nye, TV’s “The Science Guy.”

Ham hosts the daily radio program Answers, now on 1,000 stations. He’s also the founder of the award-winning Answers magazine. In 2020, Ham launched Answers TV, an ambitious streaming service. His website of AnswersInGenesis.org has twice won the top award from the National Religious Broadcasters for best website.

A prolific blogger and author of more than 30 books, Ham’s newest releases are Divided Nation (about today’s culture wars) and the devotional commentary Creation to Babel.

Ken and his wife Mally have 5 children and 18 grandchildren and reside in Northern Kentucky.


   
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