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Michigan Senate Passes SB 31, Universal Lead (Pb) Testing Of Children


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Joined: 11 months ago
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Topic starter  

This should produce some very interesting statistics:

https://legislature.mi.gov/(S(ctri2qksdunkewfd4som0nbj))/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=2023-SB-0031

SUBSTITUTE FOR SENATE BILL NO. 31

A bill to amend 1978 PA 368, entitled "Public health code," by amending section 9206 (MCL 333.9206), as amended by 1996 PA 540, and by adding section 5474d.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN ENACT:

Sec. 5474d. (1) Beginning January 1, 2024, a physician treating a patient who is a minor shall do both of the following:

(a) Test the minor for lead poisoning, or order the test for the minor, at the intervals and using the methods specified by the department by rule.

(b) If the physician performs the test described in subdivision (a), make an entry of the testing on the minor's certificate of immunization.

(2) The department shall promulgate rules to implement this section. The rules must include, but are not limited to, all of the following:

(a) Subject to subsection (3), a requirement that a minor residing in this state is tested at the following ages:

(i) 12 months of age and 24 months of age.

(ii) If the minor has no previous record of the test required under this section, between 24 months of age and 72 months of age.

(b) The identification of geographic areas in this state that pose a high risk for childhood lead poisoning and a requirement that a minor who is 4 years of age be tested if the minor resides in an area described in this subdivision.

(c) Factors to identify a minor who is at high risk for lead poisoning. The factors must include, but are not limited to, residing in a home where other minors have been diagnosed with lead poisoning and residing in a home that was built before 1978.

(d) A requirement that a minor is tested at intervals determined by the department if a physician determines that the minor is at high risk for lead poisoning by applying the factors described in subdivision (c), through a parent's attestation, or through the physician's own independent medical judgment.

(e) Procedures for entering the information described in subsection (1)(b) on the minor's certificate of immunization, including, but not limited to, procedures for entering the information if the testing is performed by a person other than a physician.

(3) The department may, by rule, adjust the age requirements described in subsection (2)(a) or eliminate the testing requirement in subsection (2)(a) if, after collecting and reviewing data on lead poisoning in this state for 5 years, the department determines that testing minors at the ages described in subsection (2)(a) is no longer necessary or appropriate to maintain the health and safety of minors who reside in this state. If the department adjusts the ages or eliminates the requirement described in subsection (2)(a) under this subsection, the department shall submit a report to the legislature detailing the department's rationale.

(4) This section does not apply to a minor whose parent, guardian, or person in loco parentis objects to testing.

(5) As used in this section, "certificate of immunization" means the certificate described in section 9206.

Sec. 9206. (1) The health care provider administering an immunizing agent to a child shall present the person accompanying the child with a written certificate of immunization, or make an entry of the immunization on a certificate in the person's possession. The certificate shall must be in a form prescribed by the department and shall must indicate the diseases or infections for which the child has been immunized, the number of doses given, the dates when administered, and whether further immunizations are indicated. Beginning January 1, 2024, the certificate must also have a space to indicate whether the minor has been tested for lead poisoning.

(2) Before administering an immunizing agent to a child, a health care provider shall notify the parent, guardian, or person in loco parentis of the child, on a form provided by the department, of the right to object to the reporting requirement of described in subsection (3).

(3) Unless the parent, guardian, or person in loco parentis of the child who received the immunizing agent objects by written notice received by the health care provider prior to reporting, a health care provider shall report to the department each immunization administered by the health care provider, pursuant to under rules promulgated under section 9227. If the parent, guardian, or person in loco parentis of the child who was immunized objects to the reporting requirement of this subsection by written notice received by the health care provider prior to notification, the health care provider shall not report the immunization.

(4) A health care provider who complies or fails to comply in good faith with subsection (3) is not liable in a civil action for damages as a result of an act or omission during the compliance, except an act or omission constituting gross negligence or willful and wanton misconduct.

(5) As used in this section, "health care provider" means a health professional, health facility, or local health department.


   
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Abigail Nobel
(@mhf)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 484
 

With this volume of testing, all set for zero tolerance, I predict an incredibly high bill for treatment. 

The human cost is incalculable.

All because cities and homeowners won't replace lead pipes. Is healthcare really that much easier to pay for than plumbing?


   
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10x25mm
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Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 399
Topic starter  

https://michiganadvance.com/blog/whitmer-signs-bills-guaranteeing-lead-screening-for-young-michigan-children/

Whitmer signs bills guaranteeing lead screening for young Michigan children
By Jon King - October 4, 2023

Bipartisan bills to guarantee the screening of minors for lead poisoning in Michigan were signed into law Tuesday by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

The legislation requires all children be tested for lead poisoning between 12 and 24 months of age, while also allowing for parents to opt out if they choose to do so.

“In Michigan, we know the importance of safe drinking water and the devastating, long-lasting impacts of lead exposure,” said Whitmer. “With our historic investments in water infrastructure over the last five years, our work to replace tens of thousands of lead service lines, and [Tuesday’s] bills to test children for lead exposure, we will protect our water and our children.”

During hearings earlier this year on the bills, health professionals, parent advocates and lawmakers supported both of the bills that were signed into law Tuesday.

Senate Bill 31, sponsored by state Sen. John Cherry (D-Flint), requires a physician treating a minor to test or order a test for lead poisoning at early ages.

“Lead poisoning poses a serious health risk to kids not only in Flint, but across Michigan,” said Cherry on Tuesday. “This legislation, which ensures access to lead testing for all children, regardless of their insurance coverage, will help parents identify early on if their children have been exposed to lead. This way, they can ensure their kids receive the treatment they need to live a happy, healthy and full life.”

House Bill 4200, sponsored by Rep. Helena Scott (D-Detroit), will update a child’s immunization certificate to include a space indicating whether the minor had been tested for lead poisoning, beginning January 1, 2024.

“The signing of this bill is a tangible commitment to regularly screen children for lead exposure at varied intervals in partnership and under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services,” said Scott. “As we work to get the lead out of our infrastructure, I see this lead screening bill as an important tool that will enable us to act quickly in cases of lead exposure, and ultimately, we can better protect the health and well-being of our young children.”

Both Flint and Benton Harbor have suffered from extensive lead poisoning, while other Michigan communities have also faced high rates, including Hamtramck and Grand Rapids. In 2021, a study published in JAMA Pediatrics found that Michigan ranked the third highest in the nation for children with elevated levels of lead in their blood.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), lead is a highly toxic metal once commonly used in paint, plumbing pipes and gasoline, and any exposure to lead can lead to a wide array of health problems, including behavioral issues, learning disabilities, seizures, anemia, and brain damage. Additionally, the CDC reports that lead exposure is especially dangerous for children under age 6 because their bodies are rapidly developing.


   
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Abigail Nobel
(@mhf)
Member Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 484
 

Well, here goes pediatric chaos.

Is it too snarky to say it will be refreshing to see them tied up with state mandates other than vaccines?


   
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